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Post Total Knee

Total Knee Replacement – Knee replacement surgery was first performed in 1968. Since then, improvements in surgical materials and techniques have greatly increased its effectiveness. Total knee replacements are one of the most successful procedures in all of medicine.

Anatomy of Knee

Causes

The most common cause of chronic knee pain and disability is arthritis. Although there are many types of arthritis,most knee pain is caused by just three types: osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and post-traumatic arthritis.

Osteoarthritis.

This is an age-related “wear and tear” type of arthritis. It usually occurs in people 50 years of age and older, but may occur in younger people, too. The cartilage that cushions the bones of the knee softens and wears away. The bones then rub against one another, causing knee pain and stiffness.


Rheumatoid arthritis. This is a disease in which the synovial membrane that surrounds the joint becomes inflamed and thickened. This chronic inflammation can damage the cartilage and eventually cause cartilage loss, pain, and stiffness. Rheumatoid arthritis is the most common form of a group of disorders termed “inflammatory arthritis.”


Post-traumatic arthritis. This can follow a serious knee injury. Fractures of the bones surrounding the knee or tears of the knee ligaments may damage the articular cartilage over time, causing knee pain and limiting knee function.


When Surgery Is Recommended

There are several reasons why your doctor may recommend knee replacement surgery. People who benefit from total knee replacement often have:

A knee that has become bowed as a result of severe arthritis-

Severe knee pain or stiffness that limits your everyday activities, including walking, climbing stairs, and getting in and out of chairs. You may find it hard to walk more than a few blocks without significant pain and you may need to use a cane or walker.

Moderate or severe knee pain while resting, either day or night

Chronic knee inflammation and swelling that does not improve with rest or medications

Knee deformity a bowing in or out of your knee

Failure to substantially improve with other treatments such as anti-inflammatory medications, cortisone injections, lubricating injections, physical therapy, or other surgeries

Possible Complications of Surgery

The complication rate following total knee replacement is low. Serious complications, such as a knee joint infection,occur in fewer than 2% of patients. Major medical complications such as heart attack or stroke occur even less frequently. Chronic illnesses may increase the potential for complications. Although uncommon, when these
complications occur, they can prolong or limit full recovery.

Discuss your concerns thoroughly with your orthopaedic surgeon prior to surgery.

Blood clots may develop in leg veins.

Infection. Infection may occur in the wound or deep around the prosthesis. It may happen while in the hospital or after you go home. It may even occur years later. Minor infections in the wound area are generally treated with antibiotics. Major or deep infections may require more surgery and removal of the prosthesis. Any infection in your body can spread to your joint replacement.

Blood clots. Blood clots in the leg veins are the most common complication of knee replacement surgery. These clots can be life-threatening if they break free and travel to your lungs. Your orthopaedic surgeon will outline a prevention program, which may include periodic elevation of your legs, lower leg exercises to increase circulation,
support stockings, and medication to thin your blood.

Implant problems. Although implant designs and materials, as well as surgical techniques, continue to advance,
implant surfaces may wear down and the components may loosen. Additionally, although an average of 115° of
motion is generally anticipated after surgery, scarring of the knee can occasionally occur, and motion may be more
limited, particularly in patients with limited motion before surgery.

Continued pain. A small number of patients continue to have pain after a knee replacement. This complication is rare, however, and the vast majority of patients experience excellent pain relief following knee replacement.

Neurovascular injury. While rare, injury to the nerves or blood vessels around the knee can occur during surgery.

Extending the Life of Your Knee Implant

Currently, more than 90% of modern total knee replacements are still functioning well 15 years after the surgery.Following your orthopaedic surgeon’s instructions after surgery and taking care to protect your knee replacement and your general health are important ways you can contribute to the final success of your surgery.

Protecting Your Knee Replacement

After surgery, make sure you also do the following:

Participate in regular light exercise programs to maintain proper strength and mobility of your new knee

Take special precautions to avoid falls and injuries. If you break a bone in your leg, you may require moresurgery

Make sure your dentist knows that you have a knee replacement. You should be given antibiotics before all dental surgery for the rest of your life

See your orthopaedic surgeon periodically for a routine follow-up examination and x-rays, usually once a year.